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Arthur " Big Boy" Crudup

Referenced from www.answers.com

Music Style Ryhthm & Blues

Profile:Reference from "All Music Guide" Born: August 24, 1905, Forest, MS
Died: March 28, 1974, Nassawadox, VA
Active: '30s, '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s
Genres: Ryhthm & Blues
Instrument: Vocals
Representative Albums: "The Father of Rock & Roll", "That's All Right Mama", "When the Sun Goes Down, Vol. 7: Rock Me Mamma Representative Songs: "That's All Right", "If I Get Lucky", "Standing at My Window

Biography Arthur Crudup may well have been Elvis Presley's favorite bluesman. The swivel-hipped rock god recorded no less than three of "Big Boy's" Victor classics during his seminal rockabilly heyday: "That's All Right Mama" (Elvis' Sun debut in 1954), "So Glad You're Mine," and "My Baby Left Me." Often lost in all the hubbub surrounding Presley's classic covers are Crudup's own contributions to the blues lexicon. He didn't sound much like anyone else, and that makes him an innovator, albeit a rather rudimentary guitarist (he didn't even pick up the instrument until he was 30 years old).

Around 1940, Crudup migrated to Chicago from Mississippi. Times were tough at first; he was playing for spare change on the streets and living in a packing crate underneath an elevated train track when powerful RCA/Bluebird producer Lester Melrose dropped a few coins in Crudup's hat. Melrose hired Crudup to play a party that 1941 night at Tampa Red's house attended by the cream of Melrose's stable: Big Bill Broonzy, Lonnie Johnson, Lil Green. A decidedly tough crowd to impress -- but Crudup overcame his nervousness with flying colors. By September of 1941, he was himself an RCA artist.

Crudup pierced the uppermost reaches of the R&B lists during the mid-'40s with "Rock Me Mama," "Who's Been Foolin' You," "Keep Your Arms Around Me," "So Glad You're Mine," and "Ethel Mae." He cut the original "That's All Right" in 1946 backed by his usual rhythm section of bassist Ransom Knowling and drummer Judge Riley, but it wasn't a national hit at the time. Crudup remained a loyal and prolific employee of Victor until 1954, when a lack of tangible rewards for his efforts soured Crudup on Nipper (he had already cut singles in 1952 for Trumpet disguised as Elmer James and for Checker as Percy Lee Crudup).

In 1961, Crudup surfaced after a long layoff with an album for Bobby Robinson's Harlem-based Fire logo dominated by remakes of his Bluebird hits. Another lengthy hiatus preceded Delmark boss Bob Koester's following the tip of Big Joe Williams to track down the elusive legend (Crudup had drifted into contract farm labor work in the interim). Happily, the guitarist's sound hadn't been dimmed by Father Time: his late-'60s work for Delmark rang true as he was reunited with Knowling (Willie Dixon also handled bass duties on some of his sides). Finally, Crudup began to make some decent money, playing various blues and folk festivals for appreciative crowds for a few years prior to his 1974 death. ~ Bill Dahl, Reference from "All Music Guide"




Arthur Crudup

Referenced from www.wikipedia.org

Music Style:Rtythm & Blues

Profile:

Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup (August 24, 1905 — March 28, 1974) was a delta blues singer and guitarist. He is best known outside blues circles for writing songs later covered by Elvis Presley and dozens of other artists, such as "That's All Right" (1946)[1], "My Baby Left Me" and "So Glad You're Mine."

Career Born in Forest, Mississippi and living and working in throughout the South and Midwest as a migrant worker for a time, he and his family returned to Mississippi in 1926. He sang gospel, then began his career as a blues singer around Clarksdale, Mississippi. He visited Chicago as member of the Harmonizing Four in 1939 and stayed there to work as a solo musician, but barely made a living as a street singer. Record producer Lester Melrose allegedly found him while he was living in a packing crate, introduced him to Tampa Red and signed him to a recording contract with RCA Victor's Bluebird label.

He recorded with RCA in the late 1940s and with Ace Records, Checker Records and Trumpet Records in the early 1950s and toured throughout the country, specifically black establishments in the South, with Sonny Boy Williamson II and Elmore James (around 1948).[2] He also recorded under the names Elmer James and Percy Lee Crudup. He was popular in the South with records such as "Mean Old 'Frisco Blues", "Who's Been Foolin' You" and "That's All Right".[3]

Crudup stopped recording in the 1950s, however, after further battles over royalties.[3] His last Chicago session was in 1951. His 1952-54 recording sessions for Victor were held at radio station WGST in Atlanta, Georgia.[2] He returned to recording with Fire Records and Delmark Records and touring in 1965. Sometimes labeled as "The Father of Rock and Roll", he accepted this title with some bemusement.[3] Ungratified due to the loss of royalties, he would refer to his admirer Presley as 'Elvin Preston'.[3] Throughout this time Crudup worked as a laborer to augment the non-existent royalties and the small wages he received as a singer. Crudup returned to Mississippi after a dispute with Melrose over royalties, then went into bootlegging, and later moved to Virginia where he had lived and worked as a musician and laborer. In the early 1970s, two local Virginia activists, Celia Santiago and Margaret Carter, assisted him in an attempt to gain royalties he felt he was due, with little success.

From the mid 1960s, Crudup returned to bootlegging and working as an agricultural laborer, chiefly in Virginia, where he lived with his family including three sons and several of his own siblings. On the Eastern Shore of Virginia, while he lived in relative poverty as a field laborer, he occasionally sang and supplied moonshine to a number of drinking establishments, including one called the Dew Drop Inn, in Northampton County for some time prior to his death from complications of heart disease and diabetes. On a 19701 trip to the UK he recorded Roebuck Man with local musicians.[3] His last professional engagements were with Bonnie Raitt.[3]

There was some confusion as to his actual date of death because of his use of several names, including those of his siblings. He died of a heart attack in the Nassawadox hospital in Northampton County, Virginia in 1974.[4]

See also Fire Records Checker Records Origins of rock and roll First rock and roll record Quotations "Do what you can do" Tampa Red told Crudup, "what you can't do, forget about it".[3] References 1 Official legal title of Crudup's 'That's All Right' 2 a b Groom, Bob, Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup, Complete Recorded Works Vol.3 (11 March 1949 to 15 January 1952) DOCD-5203, Document Records, 1993. 3 a b c d e f g Russell, Tony (1997). The Blues - From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray. Dubai: Carlton Books Limited. pp. 105. ISBN 1-85868-255-X. 4 Thedeadrockstarsclub.com - accessed November 2009

Artist

Referenced from www.discgos.com

Music Style:Rock n Roll

Profile:

Artist

Referenced from www.spotify.com

Music Style:Rock n Roll

Profile:

Arthur Crudup Recording Company Track number Chart Position  Release Date    
             
That's All Right Sun     1954    
             
So Glad Your Mine RCA Victor          
             
My Baby Left Me RCA Victor 50-0109   1951    
             
Rock Me Mama            
             
Star Bootlegger RCA Victor 50-0114   Mar 1951    
             
I,m Gonna Dig Myself a Hole RCA Victor 50-0141   Aug 1951    
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

strong>Referenced from www.answers.com
Big Joe Williams, Elvis Presley, Lightnin' Hopkins, Sonny Boy Williamson

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References: The Sound of the City ( The Rise of Rock and Roll ) by Charlie Gillett, A Brief history of Rock n Roll by Nick Johnstone, web links www.wikipedia.com www.discogs.com www.spotify.com www.last.fm copyright david crowfoot 2009, 2010.