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Amos Milburn

Referenced from www.answers.com

Music Style Rhythm & Blues

Profile: Born: April 01, 1927, Houston, TX
Died: January 03, 1980, Houston, TX
Active: '40s, '50s, '60s
Genres: Blues
Instrument: Piano
Representative Albums: "The Complete Aladdin Recordings of Amos Milburn", "The Best of Amos Milburn: Down the Road Apiece", "Let's Have a Party (The Aladdin Recordings)
Representative Songs: "Chicken Shack Boogie", "One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer", "Bad Bad Whiskey
Biography Boogie piano master Amos Milburn was born in Houston, and he died there a short 52 years later. In between, he pounded out some of the most hellacious boogies of the postwar era, usually recording in Los Angeles for Aladdin Records and specializing in good-natured upbeat romps about booze and its effects (both positive and negative) that proved massive hits during the immediate pre-rock era.

The self-taught 88s ace made a name for himself as "the He-Man Martha Raye" around Houston before joining the Navy and seeing overseas battle action in World War II. When he came out of the service, Milburn played in various Lone Star niteries before meeting the woman whose efforts would catapult him to stardom.

Persistent manager Lola Anne Cullum reportedly barged into Aladdin boss Eddie Mesner's hospital room, toting a portable disc machine with Milburn's demo all cued up. The gambit worked -- Milburn signed with Aladdin in 1946. His first date included a thundering "Down the Road Apiece" that presaged the imminent rise of rock & roll. But Milburn was capable of subtler charms too, crooning mellow blues ballads in a Charles Brown-influenced style (the two would later become close friends, playing together frequently).

The first of Milburn's 19 Top Ten R&B smashes came in 1948 with his party classic "Chicken Shack Boogie," which paced the charts and anointed his band with a worthy name (the Aladdin Chickenshackers, natch). A velvet-smooth "Bewildered" displayed the cool after-hours side of Milburn's persona as it streaked up the charts later that year, but it was rollicking horn-driven material such as "Roomin' House Boogie" and "Sax Shack Boogie" that Milburn was renowned for. Milburn's rumbling 88s influenced a variety of famous artists, notably Fats Domino.

With the ascent of "Bad, Bad Whiskey" to the peak of the charts in 1950, Milburn embarked on a string of similarly boozy smashes: "Thinking and Drinking," "Let Me Go Home Whiskey," "One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer" (an inebriating round John Lee Hooker apparently enjoyed!), and "Good Good Whiskey" (his last hit in 1954). Alcoholism later brought the pianist down hard, giving these numbers a grimly ironic twist in retrospect. Milburn's national profile rated a series of appearances on the Willie Bryant-hosted mid-'50s TV program Showtime at the Apollo (where he gave out with a blistering "Down the Road Apiece").

Aladdin stuck with Milburn long after the hits ceased, dispatching him to New Orleans in 1956 to record with the vaunted studio crew at Cosimo's. There he recut "Chicken Shack Boogie" in a manner so torrid that it's impossible to believe it didn't hit (tenor saxist Lee Allen and drummer Charles "Hungry" Williams blast with atomic power as Milburn happily grunts along with his pounding boogie piano solo). In 1957, he left Aladdin for good.

Milburn contributed a fine offering to the R&B Yuletide canon in 1960 with his swinging "Christmas (Comes but Once a Year)" for King. Berry Gordy gave him a comeback forum in 1962, issuing an album on Motown predominated by remakes of his old hits that doesn't deserve its extreme rarity today (even Little Stevie Wonder pitched in on harp for the sessions).

Nothing could jump start the pianist's fading career by then, though. His health deteriorated to the point where a string of strokes limited his mobility and his left leg was eventually amputated. Not too long after, one of the greatest pioneers in the history of R&B was dead. ~ Bill Dahl, All Music Guide

Amos Milbrun

Referenced from www.wikipedia.org

Music Style:Rhythm & Blues

Profile:Amos Milburn (April 1, 1927 – January 3, 1980) was an American rhythm and blues singer, and pianist, popular in the 1940s and 1950s. He was born and died in Houston, Texas.

He was a polished pianist and performer and in 1946 attracted the attention of an enterprising woman who arranged a recording session with Aladdin Records in Los Angeles. Milburn’s relationship with Aladdin lasted eight years during which he cut over seventy-five sides. His “Down the Road Apiece” (1946), an early jump blues with a rocking Texas boogie beat that bordered on rock, was ahead of its time.[1] However, none caught on until 1949 when seven of his singles got the attention of the R&B audience. “Hold Me Baby” and “Chicken Shack Boogie” landed numbers eight and nine on Billboard’s survey of 1949’s R&B Bestsellers.

He became one of the leading performers associated with the Central Avenue music scene of Los Angeles’ Watts neighborhood. Among his best known songs was “One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer”. In 1950 Milburn’s “Bad, Bad, Whiskey” reached the top of the R&B charts and began a string of drinking songs (none written by Milburn, but several penned by Rudy Toombs, one of the best R&B songwriters around). However, there is no evidence that Milburn had a drinking problem.

Milburn continued his successful drinking songs through 1952 {"Thinking and Drinking", "Trouble in Mind"} and was by now touring the country playing clubs. While touring the Midwest that summer, he announced that he would disband his combo and continue as a solo act and that fall he joined Charles Brown for a Southern concert tour. For the next few years his tours were made up of strings of one nighters. After three years of solo performing he returned to Houston in 1956 to reform his band. In 1957 Milburn’s releases on Aladdin Records did not sell well, and the record label, having its own problems, went out of business. He tried to regain commercial success with a few more releases on Ace Records but his time had passed. Radio airplay was becoming focused on the teenage market.

Milburn contributed a fine offering to the R&B Yuletide canon in 1960 with his swinging “Christmas (Comes but Once a Year)” for King. Berry Gordy gave him a comeback forum in 1962, issuing an album on Motown predominated by remakes of his old hits that doesn’t deserve its extreme rarity today (even Little Stevie Wonder pitched in on harp for the sessions).

Nothing could jump start the pianist’s fading career by then, though.

Milburn’s final recording was on an album by Johnny Otis. This was in 1972 after he had been incapacitated by a stroke, so much so that Otis had to play the left-hand piano parts for his enfeebled old friend.[3] His second stroke led to the amputation of a leg because of circulatory problems. He died shortly after at the age of 52 from a third stroke.

He was a commercial success for eleven years and influenced many performers. Fats Domino consistently credited Milburn as an influence on his music. At least one person has noted the similarity between Milburn’s piano fills and Chuck Berry’s later guitar stylings. Milburn was a musical pioneer, who made the transition from the swing and jump blues of the 1940s, to the R&B of the late 1940s and early 1950s, that evolved into today’s rock music.

Artist

Referenced from www.discgos.com

Music Style:Rock n Roll

Profile:

Artist

Referenced from www.spotify.com

Music Style:Rock n Roll

Profile:

Artist Recording Company Track number Chart Position Release Date     
             
Chicken Shack Boogie     1948    
             
One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer       1953    
             
Down the Road Apiece       1947    
             
Bad Bad Whiskey       1950    
             
Atomic Baby            
             
Let's Have a Party       1957    
             
Let's Rock a While            
             
Roomin' House Boogie       1949    
             
Hold Me Baby       1949    
             
Sax Shack Boogie            
             
Let Me Go Home Whiskey       1953    
             
Thinkin' and Drinkin'       1952    
             
Rockin' The Boogie       1955    
             
Good, Good Whiskey            

Referenced from www.answers.com

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References: The Sound of the City ( The Rise of Rock and Roll ) by Charlie Gillett, A Brief history of Rock n Roll by Nick Johnstone, web links www.wikipedia.com www.discogs.com www.spotify.com www.last.fm copyright david crowfoot 2009, 2010.